Renee Zettle-Sterling grieves through art

Written by Marla Miller | Wednesday, 22 March 2017 12:52 |

After the sudden death of her brother during a hunting accident in 2002, metalsmith Renee Zettle-Sterling took an interest in how to channel grief and healing through the process of making art.

“Sell” rhymes with “hell,” something David Mamet never lets us forget in his 1984 Pulitzer Prize winner Glengarry Glen Ross, set in a Chicago real estate office that’s about as cheery and chummy as a vipers’ nest. With apologies to Arthur Miller, death for these salesmen would be a relief; they are trapped in a torturous, endless purgatory of backstabbing, back-biting and brow-beatings.

Review: 'RENT' stands the test of time

Written by Kayla Tucker | Wednesday, 15 March 2017 10:12 |

Tuesday night, a standing ovation met the cast of RENT after they rocked a crowd of about 2,000 at Grand Rapids’ DeVos Performance Hall.

Review: ‘Buyer & Cellar’ sells the goods

Written by Paul Wozniak | Sunday, 12 March 2017 12:31 |

Imagine getting the opportunity to work for your favorite celebrity. Now imagine you and that celebrity becoming fast friends.

“Pictures at an Exhibition” is a musical tour through a collection of paintings, drawings and sketches, including scenes from a bustling marketplace, a witch from Slavic folklore, the catacombs of Paris, and more.

Just Kidding: Laughfest show puts a child’s wild imagination onstage

Written by Kayla Tucker | Wednesday, 01 March 2017 09:00 |

Adult comics will bring kids’ imaginations to life with a free show at this year’s Gilda’s Laughfest. This is the second annual show directed by local comedian Amy Gascon, who performs in various comedy and improv groups in Grand Rapids.

Jason Potgieter’s passion for puppeteering will come in handy for Jeremy Thatcher, Dragon Hatcher.

Music always is evolving as an art form. All composers, no matter how original or innovative, were at some point influenced by their predecessors. However, no classical composer has been more pioneering than Johann Sebastian Bach. 

Defined by specific time periods, with distinct styles and notable composers, classical music’s progression over the last 500 years has been more revolutionary than evolutionary.

Whether it be a performance hall, cathedral or taproom, the most divine acoustic experiences occur in spaces where the very inner workings of a human ear are taken into account. But that’s not exactly a simple science, according to West Michigan audio engineers.

© 2017 Revue and Revue Holding Company

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