Love Song: Mason Street Warehouse’s 'Once' is a special kind of musical

Written by Kayla Sosa | Tuesday, 31 July 2018 17:34 |

A classic love story driven by the power of music is sure to win the hearts of many in Saugatuck. Presented by Mason Street Warehouse, Once follows a Dublin street musician down on his luck who becomes inspired to keep going when a young woman is enchanted by his “haunting love songs.”

Heritage Theatre is taking a dark turn with Stephen Sondheim’s Assassins, diving into the minds of famous assassins across history.

Review: ‘Dixie’s Never Wear a Tube Top’ is a joyful, rowdy delight

Written by Marin Heinritz | Thursday, 26 July 2018 11:35 |

Dixie Longate is the brainchild of Kris Andersson, who both created and plays the fabulously sassy, bawdy, twangy fast-talking, gum-smacking, hard-drinking, glamorous, shameless truth-telling, Tupperware-slinging, nymphomaniacal motivational speaker whose high-energy shows are like exceptionally-timed stand up.

Review: Hope Summer’s ‘Godspell’ has a lot of talent and a clear audience

Written by Marin Heinritz | Wednesday, 25 July 2018 17:47 |

There are some shows for some audiences that never grow old. No matter how dated the music or how lacking in narrative beyond that which the audience brings to it, “Godspell” is one of those shows, and perhaps for nowhere more than conservative Christian stronghold Holland, Michigan.

Review: ‘The Producers’ is wickedly funny, no holds barred

Written by Marin Heinritz | Wednesday, 25 July 2018 16:59 |

What’s not to love about a gleeful, limp-wristed Adolf Hitler surrounded by exquisite, sparkling show girls donning giant bratwurst and pretzels? Absolutely nothing. And this is but one highlight of many hilarious spectacles among many in Farmers Alley’s “The Producers,” the theater’s 10th anniversary season closer and biggest production to date.

Review: One talented woman weaves a powerful, epic tale in ‘An Iliad’

Written by Marin Heinritz | Thursday, 19 July 2018 13:09 |

Dramatizing war and its effects often makes the most potent anti-war statement among art forms. Therefore, it is for good reason there is a long list of deeply moving anti-war plays, from Aristophanes’ “Lysistrata” to Euripides’ “The Trojan Women” written in the 5th Century to Brecht’s “Mother Courage and Her Children” and rock musical “Hair” in the 20th Century and beyond.

Ray Cooney’s hilarious 1983 classic British farce “Run For Your Wife” has the potential to go terribly wrong, and not just for the the taxi driver who is leading a double life with two wives he tends to in two different areas of London.

Review: ‘The Lion King’ is an intricate, awesome, well-oiled machine

Written by Dana Casadei | Sunday, 15 July 2018 12:34 |

Walking to my seat at last night’s production of The Lion King, I heard an usher comment on how this show was “something different.”

Review: ‘Bonnie & Clyde’ is complex, beautiful and all-around terrific

Written by Marin Heinritz | Friday, 06 July 2018 11:42 |

Great Depression era American criminals Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow captured newspaper readers’ imaginations of their day, becoming public figures for doing no good and creating celebrity culture before its time. And our obsession with these real-life characters who lived and loved with wanton desire and freedom only to die young in a blaze of glory never really waned. Their story has been adapted for film, television, cartoons, hip-hop songs, and podcasts, among practically infinite variations on their daring, romantic, violent tale.

Prolific comic American playwright Neil Simon has written more than 30 plays and nearly the same number of screenplays, has received more combined Oscar and Tony nominations than any other writer, and was awarded many of the most sought-after literary awards, including the Pulitzer.

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