German conductor Hans von Bülow coined the famous snap judgment of Giuseppe Verdi’s Requiem Mass: “an opera, though in ecclesiastical robes.”

Review: ‘The Diary of Anne Frank’ is heart wrenching and incredibly important

Written by Marin Heinritz | Saturday, 11 November 2017 15:54 |

Regardless of the form it takes or how much time has passed since a now-famous adolescent girl documented her life in a red checkered notebook while in hiding from the Nazis during World War II in Amsterdam, “The Diary of Anne Frank” remains powerfully moving.

Review: ‘Passing Strange’ is an evocative, emotional experience

Written by Kayla Tucker | Friday, 10 November 2017 12:58 |

“Passing Strange,” by Stew, is a beautifully raw story of a young African American boy searching for more out of life and the whirlwind of emotions he faces along the way.

Review: The Naughton Sisters dazzled at The Gilmore

Written by Samara Napolitan | Monday, 06 November 2017 10:21 |

Many renowned classical piano duos have kept it in the family — consider the Labèque sisters, the Pekinel sisters, or the Kontarsky brothers. The vast benefits of a musical partnership between siblings were obvious during Christina and Michelle Naughton’s concert with The Gilmore’s Rising Stars Series yesterday. The two 28-year-old pianists brought esoteric unity to their art form in a way only identical twins can. But as their spellbinding Sunday afternoon performance showed, the Naughton sisters are no gimmick. The two extraordinary musicians demonstrated uncanny harmoniousness and technical precision, even when expressing individual soulfulness and spontaneity across two separate Steinways.

Review: ‘All About a Table’ is focused, meaningful

Written by Marin Heinritz | Wednesday, 01 November 2017 11:11 |

In H2 Dance Company’s current modern dance program, “All About a Table,” the same sturdy rectangular table appears in all three pieces composed by Hope College dance department faculty members. The company of 11 select pre-professional student dancers move around, atop, beneath the table, at turns, as desperate housewives, birds, and tragicomic men in control of the world’s fate — all at the Knickerbocker Theatre in Holland.

From Shadow to Stage: Muskegon Civic Theatre’s new managing director

Written by Marla Miller | Monday, 30 October 2017 14:49 |

Besides directing Muskegon Civic Theatre’s latest production, Jason Bertoia is settling in to what he considers his dream job.

Sibling rivalry and timeless family dynamics set the stage for laughs and bickering in Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, the Tony Award-winning comedy on its way to Beardsley Theater.

Turn On the Lights: 'An American in Paris' explores love, healing after tragedy

Written by Kayla Tucker | Monday, 30 October 2017 14:43 |

Full of romance, dancing and drama, An American in Paris is set in the city of love at the end of World War II. The city is coming back to life, and so are the people and the romances between them.

Controlled chaos. An amorphous, musical blob. A marching band that thinks it’s a rock band.

When an orchestra performs a concerto — a composition featuring a solo instrument with orchestral accompaniment — one can usually expect to hear technical pyrotechnics from a violinist, a mind-boggling performance from a pianist, or even a thrilling showstopper from a woodwind player on clarinet or flute. But while many musicians view mastering a concerto as a rite of passage, some instrumentalists have more opportunities than others.

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