Review: 'Well Strung' lives up to its name, and then some

Written by Marin Heinritz | Saturday, 15 July 2017 13:08 |

It’s not often one attends a string quartet concert and hears witty banter among the players, much less a description of the next arrangement as “an Italian sandwich” or “almost like a tiramisu.”

Review: ‘Curious George’ is a blast, both adorable and infectious

Written by Marin Heinritz | Saturday, 15 July 2017 13:05 |

Curious George — the playful, enthusiastic, lovable monkey who has been amusing children for more than 75 years — just never gets old.

Review: 'In The Blood' is a powerful, expertly executed wake-up call

Written by Marin Heinritz | Friday, 14 July 2017 18:50 |

A review of In the Blood, performed by The Kalamazoo Black Arts and Cultural Center’s Face Off Theatre as part of the 2017 Black Arts Festival. "Cedric Russell’s fairly simple yet deeply symbolic set and Chris Riley’s dramatic lights, make this harsh critique of capitalism, misogyny, Christian hypocrisy, the welfare state, and systemic racism truly vibrant."

Review: ‘We Will Rock You’ harnesses the power of Queen

Written by Marin Heinritz | Wednesday, 12 July 2017 16:30 |

Earlier this month, a crowd of 65,000 at Hyde Park in London awaiting the start of a Green Day concert spontaneously united in a singalong to Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” as it was piped over the loudspeakers. Captured on video, the five-minute clip has gotten nearly four million views on YouTube in a little over a week. In so many ways, this anecdote embodies the power of Queen, the enduring British rock band originally led by inimitable frontman Freddie Mercury, who died in 1991. The band boasts 18 number one albums, and its progressive anthem rock is recognizable to anyone who has witnessed a sporting event live or on television, or has spun through the FM dial anytime after 1973.

Review: ‘Annie’ is sweet, fun and well-crafted

Written by Marin Heinritz | Monday, 10 July 2017 13:20 |

The story of Little Orphan Annie has been a part of popular American culture for nearly 100 years, from comic strips to radio programs, Broadway and the Silver Screen. Practically anyone alive who grew up in this culture has been exposed to the eternally optimistic little girl who, though penniless and parentless with a hard-drinking child-hating orphanage den mother and an awfully tough cohort of orphans as her posse, insists the sun will come out tomorrow.

Review: ‘Driving Miss Daisy’ is stuck in the past

Written by Marin Heinritz | Thursday, 06 July 2017 15:48 |

When aging widow and retired school teacher Daisy Werthan — a stubborn, wealthy Jewish woman in 1948 Atlanta brought up to take care of herself — can no longer drive, her son Boolie hires “colored man” Hoke Coleburn to be her chauffeur, and what quietly unfolds could only be born of that particular time and place.

Madelaine Lane spends her days in an office tower overlooking Calder Plaza, defending people for Warner, Norcross & Judd.

Summer on the Stage: Escape to Whitehall for a slower pace and live theater

Written by Marla R. Miller | Monday, 03 July 2017 09:00 |

Entertaining tourists and locals for a century, the historic Howmet Playhouse in Whitehall lights up with live theater every Thursday, Friday and Saturday for eight weeks during the summer.

There are no program notes for Saugatuck Chamber Music Festival performances. Instead, musicians tell the stories behind the compositions directly to the audience before playing the piece.

A July celebration of African American art and culture in Kalamazoo's LaCrone Park is part of an ongoing mission to expose West Michigan residents to a culture rich in diversity.

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